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Fix the Flow: Cleaning Up Hard Water

Chubbuck Bathtub Faucet Being CleanedHard water is a regular concern for renters across the country. It produces spots and crusty buildup that can look as though it is tricky to remove it. It restricts the flow of water through faucets and showerheads, starting with issues like water pressure, amongst other things. Some tenants refuse to deal with it, which undoubtedly results in faucet damage and replacement. This is a costly choice and not one we’d approve. Cleaning hard water buildup off a sink faucet, inside and out, is not mind-boggling; nevertheless, it does require a fraction of your time. With the proper information and materials, it is likely to make the faucets in your Chubbuck rental property operating as though it were brand-new.

Water that is high in calcium and other minerals, recognized as hard water, can prompt your sink faucets to look disgusting. Calcium buildup, sometimes also distinguished as limescale can furthermore produce water flow issues. If you are encountering water flow problems, the source of your concern is with the faucet aerator, set inside in the fixture. A faucet aerator is a hollow metal cylinder that screws over the end of a faucet. Within the aerator is a tiny screen, a rubber washer, a mixer disc, and perhaps a flow restrictor or an inner plastic housing. At such time when these elements get tangled with mineral deposits, the fixture will start to have water pressure problems, maybe forming an uneven or erratic flow.

To address these problems, have a go at cleaning your faucet’s aerator. Cleaning a blocked aerator is a necessary procedure, but one that must be performed meticulously to avoid damaging any of the many parts that are inside. Most aerators can be eradicated with your hand or a pair of pliers, letting you inspect the faucet spout for any deposits or blockages inside. After taking the aerator apart, simply soak the pieces in a bowl of white vinegar overnight. This will loosen the mineral buildup and allow you to rub off any debris. Re-assemble the aerator and replace it on the fixture, then check your water flow. You should see a considerable improvement before long.

White vinegar will work to tidy up hard water buildup on the exterior surfaces of a sink faucet, too. There is no need for expensive household cleaners if you utilize the method recommended by the pros at Mr. Rooter. Their website has thorough directions on how to clean hard water buildup on faucets, but the procedure is simple. Just soak some paper towels or strips of rags in white vinegar and wrap the base of the faucet with them. Fasten the rags to the faucet with rubber bands and let the vinegar sit for at least an hour, then scrub clean.

For an even simpler variant of this method, you can try the plastic bag method. To use this method, you need to fill a plastic sandwich bag with vinegar and tie it to the end of the faucet with a rubber band, confirming that the end of the fixture is completely covered in the vinegar. Let the faucet soak for an hour or two, and then remove the bag and scrub it clean. Then, test your water flow: if the problem is still there, you’ll need to try cleaning the aerator as described above.

Are you considering a move to a new rental house? If so, be sure to check out our available property listings. We might have a property that works well for you. If you’re a property owner interested in our management services, contact us online or call us at 208-234-1000 today.

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